Jay Chou rumored to have lost big bucks at the casinos





A Singapore news source recently reported that Jay Chou lost 2 million SGD (approx. 1.47 million USD) at the Marina Bay Sands Casino. As expected, the story became headline news in Taiwan, followed by more “insider reports” claiming that wasn’t all he had lost. Jay Chou was in Singapore last month to perform 3 shows as part of his concert tour. A source said he in fact visited two different casinos (the other being Sentosa) and lost nearly 100 million NTD (3.13 million USD).

President Chou was estimated to have earned 2.3 billion NTD (72 million USD) over the past 6 years. He is legendary for setting the “Cape $700 million” record (21.9 million USD), and reportedly made 550 million (17 million USD) last year. Two years ago, Jay Chou revealed that he lost NT$ 80,000 at The Venetian Macao when he was there for a concert. He complained that he “loses 9 out of 10 times!”

In addition, Jay Chou was spotted at the Las Vegas Bellagio last December while filming The Green Hornet. He was rumored to have lost 1 million USD, which his manager Yang Jun Rong (楊峻榮) denied and called it non-sense. In a phone interview with Appledaily, Jay Chou clarified about his gambling woes and joked there are finally news that’s bigger than his love life.

Starting from the left: Marina Bay Sands, Sentosa, Bellagio

In the interview, Jay Chou admitted he has been to the casinos identified in the news sources. However, he criticized the reports for over exaggerating the amount of money he lost.

Jay Chou (J): Ever since completing Curse of the Golden Flower, in which the God of Gamblers played my dad (referring to Chow Yun Fat in his legendary role), I wanted to check if my luck has gotten better.  Therefore whenever I perform in places that have a casino, I will go play a little to see if my luck is really that great.

This is something very normal, it’s just that everyone has exaggerated it, and exaggerated the amount of money. I don’t need to respond on this kind of false rumors, but I can honesty tell everyone, I did go there! Now that the news has overshadowed my scandals, I feel very good about it, but don’t let me see the same news after a week. It would make me think that everyone has ran out of news to write about.

Appledaily (A): Some sources said you lost 100 million (NTD) in Singapore casinos, and 1 million USD in Las Vegas last year, do you want to clarify?

J: I don’t need to clarify anything that anyone had said! I don’t care about any of this, I’m only concerned if reporters continue to dwell on it, and what is made out of it afterwards, like adding up the casinos in a list. I’ve been going (to the casinos) since my first album, no one wrote anything about it back then, when it became newsworthy, everyone started to make stories, that’s very unfair to me!

A: Did you go to the casinos when you were filming The Green Hornet in the US last year?

J: Going back and forth (to the US) for three months, I went there whenever I was free on the weekends. I would play the guitar and write songs over the 4-hour drive to the casinos, “Free Tutorial Video” was written on my way there. It felt a lot like a movie, going to a city of crime like Las Vegas to play for 1 to 2 days, calming myself down before going back to work, and relax a bit!

A: (You) always try your luck at the casinos while touring?

J: That’s right! Any normal celebrity would do this, unless (they) don’t want to talk about it. Moreover, there’s not much that I refuse to talk about, and there's nothing to hide.

A: You said the dollar amount was exaggerated, so what is the actual small amount you lost?

J: I don’t need to announce the amount just because of some ridiculous reports.

A: If the amount was minimal, then why are there so many news about (your time at) the casinos?

J: It's nothing strange, if you go there then someone will talk about it. I was born to be the center of gossip.

Chow Yun Fat, The God of Gamblers

Source: Appledaily, Libertytimes, fatchow.com



 
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